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Wednesday 23 August 2017
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Shape up for summer with the help of YorkTest’s Ideal Weight Programme!

With summer holidays around the corner, you want to feel confident on the beach. But if those stubborn pounds won’t shift, despite a healthy diet and regular exercise, a food intolerance† could be sabotaging your weight-loss efforts. A stressed digestive system has difficulty processing nutrients and energy for the body – and eating foods you have a reaction to may affect gut flora and cause inflammation, bloating and weight gain.

Identifying your personal ‘food fingerprint’
Symptoms of food intolerance may not manifest until up to three days after eating problem ingredients, so it is difficult to work out what is causing a reaction. A diet suitable for one person may not help another as every individual has his or her own food triggers¹. Many people try keeping a food diary or cutting out certain foods, but it can be hard to ascertain what the culprits are.

One way to pinpoint your personal food triggers is to test for IgG antibodies in the blood – your body produces the antibody as a defence against certain foods that may not agree with you. YorkTest’s Ideal Weight Programme, £319, is a food-specific IgG test designed to help you get on the right track with your diet this summer. It involves a simple finger prick blood test carried out at home and the blood sample is sent back to YorkTest’s laboratory and analysed for reactions to 158 food and drink ingredients.

The kit also includes a daily food and drinks diary, a low GI diet plan, plus tailored advice with Nutritional Therapist to help you replace trigger foods with balanced alternatives. Eating foods with a low score on the glycaemic index can help keep your blood sugars steady, and low GI foods such as lean meat, fish, nuts, seeds and vegetables, can speed up the rate at which your body burns fat and keep you feeling fuller for longer.

How removing ‘trigger’ foods aids weight loss
Food intolerances have a crucial impact on weight loss and obesity. Dr Gill Hart, Scientific Director at YorkTest, authored a white paper² showing that a balanced diet that removed common food triggers may help shed excess weight. The pilot study surveyed a wide range of individuals who took a food-specific IgG test programme with YorkTest and embarked on an elimination diet after they identified their personal food triggers. The findings revealed that:

  • 83% experienced weight loss in the first two to four weeks
  • 43% lost between 11Ibs and 20Ibs
  • 9% lost even more than this, despite the fact that the main objective for the majority (87%) was to ease digestive issues or other symptoms.

Dr Gill Hart says: “Evidence suggests a food intolerance-led elimination diet can help sufferers of conditions such as bloating, migraine, indigestion and IBS, among other complaints, and improve quality of life. But these findings show an important link to weight loss too. There are countless dietary programmes out there, but none recognise the possibility that some foods, even healthy ones like carrots or lentils, buckwheat or limes, could be an obstacle to losing weight.

“The process of food intake and uptake is complex, but it is accepted that obesity correlates with inflammation in the body. We can attribute the weight loss in this study to the digestive system functioning more effectively, and a reduction in the immune system reacting to foods it sees as hostile… the research backs up our belief in the importance of a personalised ‘food fingerprint’ to aid health and wellbeing, and now we can see the added benefit of weight loss.”

YorkTest advise that you consult with your GP first if you are experiencing the types of symptoms mentioned in this testimonial.

Read YorkTest’s weight-loss case studies here.

More information about Ideal Weight Programme can be found at www.yorktest.com/products/ideal-weight-programme/

† Food intolerance defined as a food-specific IgG reaction

¹ Defined as those causing a positive IgG reaction to antibodies in the blood

² White paper: Food-specific IgG guided Elimination Diet: a Strategy for Weight Loss? Dr Gillian R. Hart, May 2016. The pilot surveyed 38 subjects.

YorkTest – Helping identify your personal food fingerprint

About YorkTest

YorkTest Laboratories have more than 35 years of excellence in laboratory diagnostic testing, and specialise in food and drink specific IgG antibody testing programmes.

The expert team at YorkTest are passionate about offering health screening services that can support wellbeing, underpinned by the principle that each person’s digestive sensitivities are unique to them. Endorsed by medical professionals, such as GP Dr Hilary Jones and elite sports players, YorkTest tests measure food-specific IgG antibodies to help pinpoint food triggers that may be affecting an individual’s health and lifestyle.

Beginning with the FirstStep Test and using a simple finger-prick blood sample taken at home, YorkTest’s qualified scientists measure food-specific IgG antibody reactions from its accredited UK laboratory. If IgG reactions are found, then clients can choose from a range of full programme tests which include colour coded results, alongside a 12-week food diary and guidebook, including help and advice about nutrition and optimising your diet.

For those selecting one of the full testing programmes, expert aftercare is provided by BANT[1] -registered Nutritional Therapists who provide guidance on an individual’s ‘food fingerprint’ – advising on nutritional optimisation and how to safely remove ingredients, whilst ensuring a healthy balanced diet.

Three out of four people who undertook one of the full testing programmes, and tested positive for IgG reactions, reported an improvement in wellbeing after embarking upon their elimination diet, and for 68% this was within three weeks*.

Dr Gill Hart, Scientific Director at YorkTest, is a leading UK Biochemist and a media-friendly expert on food intolerance. She is a credible and respected authority on a range of related issues including use of
diagnostic testing, biochemistry of satiety, appetite and weight loss, IBS and digestive health, nutrition and mental health, fertility, diabetes testing, inflammatory markers and vitamin D.

Keep updated on YorkTest via the website: www.yorktest.com, which includes blog posts about food intolerance issues, key trigger foods and diet management advice. Follow YorkTest via Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (@yorktest_uk).

[1] British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy
*Hardman and Hart, Nutrition and Food Science (2007)

Testing Options

FirstStep Test – initial positive/negative result for food intolerance

Full Programme Tests (4 options available) – test for reactions to 158 food and drink ingredients, including full colour-coded results, 12-week food diary and guidebook, and expert nutritional support from BANT-registered Nutritional Therapist.




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